Heartbreak is painful because when your heart is broken, it can feel like the apocalypse. No measure of torment has ever felt so anguishing or thought. It resembles a monster opening was pulverized into your chest, with no expectation of fix. A lady who once had her heart broken can figure out how to pardon, truly, however, she will always remember how a broken heart feels. I was recently talking to some good friends of mine Dalene from Dalene Ekirapa from Dalene Ekirapa and Karen from Karen Monica with whom I have done certain previous projects earlier about it and I asked about their input on it and what they said was interesting.

Dalene says

For first lovers, upon suffering a heartbreak, you may find yourself disliking men, most men of the same niche as your ex boyfriend. A case where a boyfriend cheats on you, going to the next relationship, you will have this prior suspicion the guy will also do the same to you.

Most times we lack appetite for food, we feel we’re good, we deprive ourselves food, my advice, eat, even if you don’t feel like, don’t trust your guts, you know the importance of healthy eating and drinking of water. Remember life has to go on. You’ll soon get over it and you’ll need to be healthy to do your routines.

Sure, you may feel like you deserve to die, like you should kill the nerd, don’t trust yourself again. Seek advice from the few you have around.

If you want to get over it quickly, be as much open about it, to anyone you feel like, care less about who they’ll tell, be intentional, your aim is to get over it. Talking is by far the best therapy ever. You may shed 2-4 tears if you feel like. But never cry alone in a lonely room, it’ll dehydrate you.

Dalene Ekirapa

Karen Says

To me, every heartbreak sucks at the beginning. It not only drains you
emotionally but it hurts you physically as well. You are at the point
where you feel that you have just lost everything (that may not be the
truth in reality) but that is how the mind reacts when you get rejected.

You feel so unmotivated. It is like the world has shut you out. You look around and you feel that everyone is happy except you. You just want to be
by yourself in a room and cry your heart out. And that gets you down even
more.

Heartbreak is an emotional chaos. Your stress levels starts to soar high.
You would avoid looking at yourself in the mirror because you look like a
mess.

But all that usually happens only at the beginning phase of a heartbreak.
Once you get to overcome that roller coaster period, you will start to see
a newer you.

Slowly the emotional and physical pain will start to heal. The stress
levels will go back to normal. You will feel emotionally stronger. The
world will start to look like a much better place. You will be inspired to
improve your life.

I believe that each heartbreak will nurture you to be a better and
stronger person. You are still smiling and standing after all that
emotional chaos, aren’t you?

Karen Monica

Well, to be honest Karen’s question made me question myself and then I came up with ideas how to deal with it, of course we all handle our heartbreaks in our own way but the one I am about to mention here are the one which will help you with the grief of heartbreak.

Take it each day by itself.

Or on the other hand, hell, one breath at any given moment. One minute on end. When I was down and crushed, I couldn’t envision how on the planet I would endure, not to mention do basically everything that I knew was coming. Contemplating what’s to come was completely overpowering. I couldn’t do it. Rather, I simply focused on single days. The present was excruciating, yet I remained there. I remained with the agony as it ebbed and moved as the days progressed. What’s more, the days crawled by, everyone a little triumph.

Connect.

Web stories can be great, yet it’s your friends and family will’s identity a gift from heaven during melancholy. Try not to delay to contact your loved ones quickly when something disastrous has happened.

During my first break up (the only break up which hurt me) my mom was already dead so I talked to my dad, and a few of my close friends soon after my break up. They couldn’t influence the agony to leave, yet they tuned in and said what they could. I realized I was thought about. I realized they were concerned. Feeling that adoration advised me that I wasn’t useless. I was as yet the same me.

Discover comfort in music.

After the split, I sat in an airplane terminal, tuning in to “Hurt” by Johnny Cash, crying discreetly to myself as neglectful individuals strolled by. It felt great to give it a chance to out. It was a piece of my recuperating procedure. Music was another consistent, something that wouldn’t disappoint me. I think I presumably tuned in to each tragic melody I’d at any point heard. It wasn’t an approach to feel frustrated about myself (OK, perhaps a bit) as much as other methods for realizing I wasn’t the only one. It was a method for feeling all the more powerfully the torment in the tunes and verses of others, a method for sympathizing with them and realizing they saw how I felt as well.

Keep up your daily routine

This was maybe the hardest activity after what occurred—come back to my everyday practice. Truly, I had a craving for securing myself a dim stay with ten pounds of dessert and sucking my thumb for the following couple of months. It didn’t appear to be conceivable to come back to my everyday life. In any case, I did, and sooner or later, I understood that it was my standard that was restoring my feeling of direction. In reality, doing things took my psyche off of the gap in my chest and helped me to remember my esteem.

Accept.

It takes a specific proportion of confidence to fall into a dark opening of torment, grab around carelessly for some time, and in the long run develop. My circumstance felt without anything positive. It appeared as though there was nothing to hang my cap on. However, someplace, profound inside me, I figured out how to discover the mettle to trust that things would be better once more. I trusted that life would not neglect me. I trusted I could endure the hardship, and following a couple of months, the skyline didn’t look so distressing any longer. I started to leave the past where it was intended to be—behind me—and to discover fulfillment in the present.

Well at the end, I would just say that maybe it is hard to move on but not impossible.

I would love to know your thoughts too about this so let me know.

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Written by M
Bibliophile, Full-time Blogger, Businesswoman as well as a Psychological Counsellor. Caffeine addict ☕